Goodbye nine to five, workers set to thrive

Fast broadband is giving the country’s capital smarter work options.

Ever dreamt of a job that lets you to sleep an extra 30 minutes in the morning? Always wanted to beat the rush hour or even work from the comfort of your own home?

Access to new technologies and infrastructure means professionals are increasingly redefining the traditional nine-to-five office day, and embracing the flexibility to work from anywhere at any time. 

Regional Develpment Australia (RDA) Southern Inland, RDA ACT and the University of Canberra have released a research report that explores this new era of working.

The report looks into the extent and benefits of smart work practices in the ACT and surrounding regions. It finds that the number and proportion of workers participating in telework is gradually increasing in the ACT. 

The report defines smart work as “working in a way that allows people to be most productive for a given task”. Examples include working in alternate work spaces such as home offices, public spaces such as cafés or libraries, and communal work hub spaces.

One of the focus areas of the report is Gungahlin. This Canberra suburb displays high potential for becoming a "smart work hub" due to its current infrastructure.

Gungahlin local Tony Ozanne knows too well the benefits of smart working as he runs his business coaching company from his home office. 

Now offering services such as webinars and online business coaching, Tony says access to reliable internet and consistent connectivity has helped him expand his business.

Tony believes having access to infrastructure such as the nbn™ network has dramatically improved the way he works as he can work around his life, choosing when to be online. 

Gungahlin Community Council’s Vice President, Peter Elford says Gungahlin is a great place to live because of the lifestyle and standard of living on offer. 

Tony certainly agrees as his work-life balance allows him to take a bike ride with his son or kick the football at the local park during once “traditional” work hours.